Tandridge District Council – Press Release 24 March 17

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Tandridge District Council Press Release 24.3.17

Council to boost car parking spaces in Oxted to encourage visitors

Last night’s Resources and Community Services Committees both agreed a new five year Parking Strategy, which will provide a framework for better parking provision, management and enforcement across the district.

Increased parking provision is central to Regeneration Oxted, an ambitious plan to revitalise the town centre through a multi-million pound programme of strategically important projects. It includes plans to remove the gasholder, make the town more attractive and provide start-up space for small business in the town centre.

This will transform the retail and leisure offer of the town and attract more visitors. As part of this the Council is developing detailed options for additional capacity which could provide in the region of 40% more spaces.

In a recent review of parking, residents and businesses highlighted issues with current enforcement arrangements, an increase in commuter on-street parking and insufficient availability of parking for shoppers and workers.

The review started with a survey of parking in Oxted and detailed plans for new parking arrangements for Oxted will be available by the end of 2017.

As part of the strategy, parking charges will be brought in to council owned car parks in Oxted town centre to help provide additional car park capacity for residents, visitors and local businesses, but there will be no charges in the evenings, Sundays or bank holidays and one hour of free parking will be available.

There will still be free parking for special events run by the Oxted BID. Having consulted with Surrey County Council, on-street parking within Oxted will also continue to be free. The District Council will also introduce new enforcement arrangements over the summer.

Louise Round, Chief Executive, said: “If we are to boost the local economy and encourage new businesses into the area, we not only have to redevelop Oxted, we also need to provide more and better short and long term parking options. Introducing parking charges will help encourage more visitors, provide more parking and better manage and enforce parking which is vital for the prosperity of the town.”

The new charges are set out below:

 

Period Charge
0 – 1 hour Free
1 hour – 2 hours £1.50
2 hours – 3 hours £3
3 hours – 4 hours £4.50
Over 4 hours £6.50

 

These charges will apply to Ellice Road Car Park between 8am and 5pm on weekdays and Saturdays and in the Council Office car park and Johnsdale car park on Saturdays between 8am and 5pm. Charges will be reviewed regularly by the Community Services Committee.

 

Tandridge District Council – Press Release 15 March 17

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Tandridge District Council Press Release 15.3.17

Council set to agree multi million pound regeneration programme for Oxted

Next week’s Resources Committee on 23 March will consider proposals for Regeneration Oxted an ambitious plan to revitalise the town centre through a multi-million pound programme of strategically important projects.

The Programme will improve the vitality and viability of the town centre by:

  • Achieving the removal of the Oxted gasholder and providing additional town centre housing on the site.
  • Making the town centre more attractive and supporting the town’s retail and evening economy through an Urban Redesign project in Station Road East and West.
  • Providing additional parking spaces for residents, visitors and local businesses.
  • Looking at opportunities to provide business start-up and office space in the town centre.

The programme will be delivered by Tandridge District Council working with Surrey County Council, the Oxted Business Improvement District and St William property developers, supported by a mixture of public and private funding. The Council has successfully secured funding from the Local Enterprise Partnership (LEP) to support feasibility work for the Urban Redesign Project and additional parking delivery. All aspects of the Regeneration Oxted programme will be subject to public consultation.

The Oxted Gasholder

Following talks with the owners of the site, Scotia Gas Networks and National Grid Property, the Council has reached an agreement to bring the site forward for development. St William has indicated they intend to submit a formal planning application in summer 2017.

Station Road East and West Urban Redesign Project

The Council is supporting the Oxted Business Improvement District (BID) in an ambitious Urban Redesign Project. Last year the BID commissioned urban designers Greer Pritchard, whose portfolio includes the 2012 Olympic Park design, to create conceptual proposals for a market square, improved town centre layout, better access, more greenery, more seating and more attractive paving and surfacing. With LEP funding secured, feasibility work will now begin.

Additional parking

The Oxted parking review findings identified a lack of capacity at peak times and a need for better enforcement. As such the Council will develop detailed options for additional capacity which could provide in the region of 40% more spaces. To help provide, manage and enforce parking, the Council plans to introduce charges for car park use at a level appropriate to the area and taking into account comparable charges elsewhere.

Business Hub

Feedback from small and micro businesses has highlighted the difficulties of finding affordable, flexible office space, forcing businesses out of the area or restricting their ability to grow. To address this, the Council will look at opportunities for business start-up and office space in the town centre. This will improve employment opportunities and help grow and retain businesses.

Councillor Simon Ainsworth, Chairman of the Resources Committee, said: “Like many similar sized town centres, Oxted is facing increased competition from other towns and online retailers. To keep the economy of Oxted town centre vibrant, we need to take an ambitious, approach. By removing the gasholder and building new homes, improving the appearance of the town centre, increasing the parking provision and supporting small businesses, we will enable the town to flourish, grow and help drive the economy of the area.”

Local Plan Strategy – Foreword

Foreword

I am delighted to introduce our preferred strategy for the Council’s Local Plan, which sets out in detail how we intend to deliver our vision for the district up to 2033. Tandridge is characterised by its openness, with Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty and the highest proportion of Green Belt land in the country.

We want it to keep this character, while at the same time being a place where people from all walks of life have access to homes, jobs, education, leisure and health facilities and where the transport infrastructure meets the needs of the modern world. Balancing these competing needs is not easy. We have worked hard to set out a strategy which will provide homes for people and the services to go with them, while protecting the distinctive nature of the area. We believe a combination of a new garden village and some limited development of our urban and semi-rural areas is the right way forward, even though this could mean releasing a small amount (around 1%) of Green Belt land where there are exceptional circumstances to justify this.

This strategy does not set out in detail exactly where new development will take place, but provides the guiding principles by which those decisions will be taken in consultation with the people of Tandridge.

Councillor Martin Fisher

Leader of Tandridge District Council

 

Tandridge District Council – Press Release 9 March 17

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Tandridge District Council Press Release 9.3.17

Planning Policy Committee to debate Local Plan Strategy which aims to protect Green Belt

Following the recent announcement by Leader of the Council, Councillor Martin Fisher, outlining his vision for a strategic approach to development, the Planning Policy Committee on 16 March will debate the strategy that underpins that vision and sets out the Council’s strategic approach to development for the district up to 2033.

In his speech to full Council on 24 February, Councillor Fisher put forward the proposal for a garden village, as part of the creation of the Local Plan. This would require the release of around 1% of Green Belt land. At the moment five sites will need to be further considered as the plan moves forward, these sites have been submitted to the Council by landowners and developers. These are on land in Blindley Heath, Chaldon – Alderstead and Tolsworth Farm, land west of Edenbridge. Redhill Aerodrome and South Godstone.

The strategy, which has been developed as part of the creation of the Local Plan, aims to keep the district’s character, while at the same time being a place where people from all walks of life have access to homes, jobs, education, leisure and health facilities and where the transport infrastructure meets the needs of the modern world.

The Local Plan is the opportunity to set out how this can realistically be achieved and set down the standards developers will need to follow. The strategy proposes a combination of a new garden village and some limited development of urban and semi-rural settlements as the right way forward, even though this could mean releasing a small amount of Green Belt land.

Without looking at the Green Belt, the Council will only be able to deliver just over a third of the housing needed. This approach would not boost the supply of housing as required by the government and would not pass the independent examination of the Local Plan, which could mean the Council losing the ability to control and plan for development in the district, putting more Green Belt at risk.

At this stage, the strategy does not set out in detail exactly where new development will take place, but sets out the principles on which decisions will be based. Once locations which can be developed have been identified, further consultation will take place to ensure the final Local Plan caters for present and future needs.

Councillor Peter Bond, Chairman of the Planning Policy Committee, said: “The strategy to create a garden village will help us provide affordable homes for local people and the infrastructure to go with them, while protecting the distinctive nature of the area. Releasing a small amount of the Green Belt will enable us to protect the rest. Otherwise we are in danger of an increasingly elderly population living alone in large houses, which means there are no houses for young families and future generations, or for those who want to downsize. This also has an adverse impact on the local economy. Balancing these competing needs is not easy. We have worked hard to set out a strategy which will ensure the district is a viable and vibrant place to live, work and visit.”